Primer for Deficit and Tax Reduction

Left exsanguinous by property and federal taxes?  Reconsider one of my Green Party 2008/2010 congressional position statements.  The 2012 U.S. budget allocates over $800 billion to our baseline military, averaging $8,000 per taxpayer annually, a sum not including tens of billions for the CIA, NSA, or veterans’ disability payments (the latter sacrosanct and inviolable but also interminable like “continuous war”).  The overall military budget for the Pentagon and related programs accounts for 56 percent of all federal discretionary spending (which excludes Medicare and Medicaid).  Using Ralph Nader’s figures (The Seventeen Solutions), attributed to former assistant secretary of defense, Lawrence Korb, I calculate the drone-loving Obama administration can save an average $600/taxpayer/year just by canceling the V-22 Osprey, reducing active troops in Europe and Asia by one-third, reducing Virginia class submarine/DDG-51 destroyer procurements to one/year, stopping aircraft carrier construction, and modest ground force and F-35 fighter jet reductions. Cut the Pentagon budget to 2000 figures (then $300 billion), as I proposed in 2008/2010, and our average tax burden drops almost $5,000/year/taxpayer.  As Nader references Andrew Bacevich to instruct our militarist President in The Seventeen Solutions, James Madison perhaps said it best in 1795: “War is the parent of armies.  From these proceed debts and taxes….bringing the many under the domination of the few….No nation could preserve its freedom in the midst of continual warfare.”

 

G. Scott Deshefy

Lebanon, CT 06249

 

Lesson Learned?


Even before Citizens United v. FEC legitimized corporate takeover of American government, Green Party candidates made publicly financed elections, term limits, instant runoff voting, proportional representation and equitable ballot and media access hallmarks of our campaigns.  We emphasized how Green Party bylaws prohibit taking corporate, PAC, “dark money” and other special interest campaign donations. Unfortunately, at least in 2008 and 2010, too few American voters preferred democracy to the plutocracy and corporate oligarchy we have.


In private, even Democrats and Republicans know how corrupting their coveted big money is and bemoan spending 60% to 70% of their time in Washington seeking lobbyists to finance campaigns instead of doing their job. But the two moneyed parties refuse to reform campaign finance laws in fear of losing influence and advantage. No wonder America’s problems worsen.


The same holds true for congressional redistricting laws, an on-going battle between Democrats and Republicans to rig elections in their favor. I ran for Congress in 2008 and 2010 because I sensed a critical juncture in our history, a time when futures of our country and planet required progressive ideas and leadership. Unfortunately, we came to that turning point and didn’t turn. Most voters doubled down on the two-party status quo disaster.


G. Scott Deshefy was Green Party candidate for U.S. House of Representatives, 2nd CT Congressional District in 2008 & 2010 

 

Thanks to all Who Supported My Campaign.

I want to take this opportunity to thank everyone, who supported my 2010 congressional candidacy either in word, deed or well wishes.  As expounded recently on my website (DeshefyforCongress.org), I conclude that America and the planet are going to continue their concurrent declines, largely because neither the Democrat nor Republican parties have the acumen or progressive tendencies to effect systemic changes outlined in my campaign platform.  Regionalizing energy and food are just two of many examples.  More than any other time in our history, there is an urgent need for a progressive movement in America, such as that embraced and led by the Green Party.  It is happening in much of Europe and parts of Asia.  But, in America the impetus is just the opposite. Radical conservatives have taken to streets and airwaves and accelerated convergence of the two toxic parties, be it the stealth conservatism of one moneyed party or the unvarnished conservatism of the other.  Each is financed by corporate campaign contributions, and an unenlightened, right-wing minority amplifying their harmful agenda via recitation of bumper sticker slogans.

 

It was an honor and privilege to represent your progressive views both in this election and in 2008.  We need young folks and older activists in the GP to be future banner carriers and for the logistical support we sadly lack in comparison to Democrat and Republican machines.  It’s a tough row to hoe when Joe Courtney in his victory speech on election night thanked his cadres of volunteers and paid staff for making 83,000 phone calls the day before the election.  83,000!!  Meanwhile, I again put out 200 campaign signs throughout the 2nd District (Enfield to Stonington…Madison to Putnam) entirely by myself in a 1985 Olds Ciera.   I would not have had the resolve to fight that fight had I not been certain that I represented the better judgment and far-sighted ideals of all of you.  Thanks again and best regards…….Scott  

The Importance of Your Vote

In one of the recent congressional debates, my opponent used the oxymoron, “green military,” to describe uses of solar panels in pop-up tents.  Of course, much of our militarism around the world is designed to support our profligate use of cheap foreign oil and other imported fossil fuels and uranium in America.  The “green military” is thus a major contributor to pollution.  In the last 24 hours, over 200,000 acres of rainforest have been destroyed (for those “denialists”, who refuse to admit what is scientifically definitive, that human activity is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions and resulting climate change).  Also, within the last 24 hours, fully 13 million tons of toxic chemicals have been released to the environment.  Over 45,000 people have died of starvation, 38,000 of them children, and more than 130 plants or animal species have been irretrievably driven to extinction by the actions of humans.  I acquaint you with these statistics 24 hours before Tuesday’s election so voters may ponder the consequences of not voting for Green Party candidates.  Over half of the world’s wetlands have been destroyed in the past century, over half the planet’s forests are gone, 85% of grasslands and 45% of earth’s land surface suffer from severe soil degradation, and 75% or more of the marine fisheries are depleted.  If Green candidates, such as I, do not prevail in the upcoming election, it means that a large majority of Americans just don’t give a damn.

 

Notice I said Americans, not citizens of the world.  While the stealth conservatives (Democrats) and unvarnished conservatives (Republicans) are being pushed by an element of the conservative Right in the U.S., millions of progressive citizens are engaged in more dramatic and historic movements in Europe.  In France, millions are in the streets fighting against extension of retirement ages from 60 to 62 or 65 to 67.  A percentage of Americans comparable to the French population so engaged would be equivalent to 12 million Americans taking to the streets and demonstrating for progressive causes.  Where are they? 

 

I’ve said repeatedly during this campaign that the “two-party” Congress is so engaged in obstructionism and “incrementalism” that it cannot adapt to the rapidly changing world.  Neither do Congressmen without scientific background have the knowledge or skills to react to these highly mutable cultural/geopolitical and ecological changes, the latter the most profound and destabilizing in the last 10,000 years.  Some of the paralysis is institutional and bipartisanship, all the more reason Green congressmen would be a catalyst to progressive, systemic changes desperately needed.  But, it all starts with the electorate, an electorate too distracted by its economic distresses to be properly engaged in the electoral process.  As I’ve written in this website, the origins of this disengagement by American voters and lack of positive, progressive activism may be traced to the early 1970s.  That was when individual indebtedness became mind-numbing for Americans.  Worker productivity rose in unprecedented fashion while wages flat-lined.  The increasing disparity between wages and productivity translated into avaricious and equally unprecedented profits: profits for big business, corporations and CEOs with which obligatory services of two-party incumbents and hopefuls were purchased.  So too, American workers have become exhausted by indebtedness and wanting for self-esteem, believing disparities between wages, cost of living and productivity is their fault.  It isn’t.  The Green Party and I know the responsible parties. I’m a “majoritarian.”  The Green Party and I embrace what the people of Connecticut want as shown in my platform planks.  If you feel the nation is going in the wrong direction, as 70% of Americans do in a recent poll, please remember that BOTH Democrats and Republicans have had their hands on the steering wheel.  I ask for your vote to make them accountable.  Please don’t complain if you vote for one of two brands of the same poison and Democrats and Republicans continue to make you drink it as they have for decades.  The reclamation of America starts Tuesday.  But only if you vote Green.  Thank you for your support.

 

Scott Deshefy      October 31, 2010

Media Should Not Obstruct Democracy

Given the strength of my positions, had I nearly the unpaid media coverage afforded my two “toxic” party challengers, polls might show me favored to win.   The electorate isn’t as stupid as Democrats and Republicans presume.   Knowing my opponents will perpetuate a dysfunctional status quo, a wise, dissatisfied electorate would embrace my propositions given equitable coverage.  People throughout America and the globe have read my website and position statements, e-mailing or phoning support. The Library of Congress sought permission to include my analyses among their historical political websites. The BBC has interviewed me by phone and may again October 29th in Connecticut because they see no disparity between my role saving the Sub-base from closure in 2005 and the partial transitioning (I advocate) of military to nonmilitary industries to create sustainable jobs and productions useful to society and the national account (e.g. green technologies, alternative energy, mass transit).  The U.K. is committed to doing the same.  Great Britain knows from experience how Electric Boat has hemorrhaged 20,000 jobs because successive congressmen bailed it out with ephemeral contracts rather than championing diversification.

 

Fair and equal coverage of opposition party candidates is anathema to media, whose primary objective is selling soap.  Advertising, once an unpleasant garnish for network programming and news, is now the main course, news coverage and programming mere subplots.  TV and radio “news people” have become politically allegiant, corporately subservient “personalities” distracting the public with court jests and buffoonery, marginalizing progressive change advocates, calling us hobos but not acknowledging Democrat and Republican bums.  Corporate media control nearly everything we read, watch or hear, imposing bland uniformities of opinion, keeping electorates politically passive, teaching helplessness.  Moneyed parties exploit that dependency, suggesting (with media complicit) only two political choices exist, their candidates, interchangeable parts, no choice at all. Opposition candidates, in whose hands America’s fate rests, have but four tools at our disposal: truth, courage, public access media and ballot boxes.  My website is DeshefyforCongress.org.   Please visit it before November 2.  The BBC and Library of Congress have.

 

Scott Deshefy is the 2010 Green Party candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives (2nd CT congressional district)

 

 

Written and submitted for your consideration by G. Scott Deshefy, 213 Hoxie Road, Lebanon, CT 06249  tele. 860-642-7066.

We Must Be the Democracy We Want

I believe, if I had nearly the same media coverage as my two “toxic” party challengers, polls would now show me a clear favorite to win the election November 2 (not at 12%).   The electorate isn’t as stupid as Democrats and Republicans presume it to be.   Given equal access to media and opportunity to describe in detail how my positions and prescribed solutions to our myriad problems will save America, rather than perpetuate a dysfunctional status quo created and guaranteed to be continued by my opponents, a wise electorate would vote for my systemic changes November 2nd.  It is no mere coincidence that people throughout America and the globe have read my website and position statements and e-mailed or telephoned their support.  The BBC has offered to interview me on October 29th here in Southeastern Connecticut, perhaps while touring the sub-base, not only because they are aware of my role in saving the base from BRAC closure in 2005, but because the Green Party and I advocate transitioning Connecticut’s corporate military sites, in some part, to additional industries which create more sustainable jobs and something more useful to U.S. society and the national account, such as green technologies, alternative energy and mass transit production.  The U.K. is “growingly” committed to do the same.  Great Britain knows from its own experience that Electric Boat has hemorrhaged 20,000 jobs since the 1980s because our congressmen bail them out with increasingly ephemeral contracts rather than acknowledge the need to diversify.   As my colleague Jeff Russell points out, the best you can hope for wasting taxpayer money on elaborate weapons systems is that they will never have to be used.

 

Of course fair and equal coverage of opposition party candidates is anathema to the media, whose primary objective is to sell soap.  Advertising was once an unpleasant garnish sprinkled about major network programming and news coverage.  Now advertising is the main course and news coverage, programming and, dare I say it, journalism, mere subplots.  TV and radio “news people” have become blindly allegiant, corporately subservient commentators, “personalities” distracting the public with court jests and buffoonery, marginalizing advancers of progressive change.  Corporate media control nearly everything we read, watch or hear, imposing a bland uniformity of opinion, keeping the electorate politically passive, teaching helplessness.  The toxic parties rely on that dependency and exploit it, suggesting with media complicit that only two choices exist November 2nd, their candidates, interchangeable parts, no choice at all. We, the opposition, in whose hands the fate of America rests, have but four tools at our disposal, truth, courage, the public media (blogs, websites, cable TV and impromptu soapboxes) and the ballot box.  My website is DeshefyforCongress.org.   Please go to it before November 2.  The BBC has.

 

Scott Deshefy is the 2010 Green Party candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives (2nd CT congressional district)

Time for New Wine in the Old Bottle

AOL 2010 CONGRESSIONAL CANDIDATES’  CLOSING ARGUMENTS


Time is long overdue to elect a Green Party candidate to Congress. Our nation and the planet are in deep trouble, and the moneyed two-party stacking of the electoral deck, producing decades of incompetence in Congress, is jointly responsible. Unlike my opponents, I am prohibited by Green Party bylaws from taking a single nickel of corporate or PAC donations.  Unlike my opponents, I am neither a career politician nor a high-paid reader of Teleprompters.  I’m a scientist and collegiate lecturer, who devoted 26 years of state service (CT Dept. of Environmental Protection) to defending the citizenry and ecology of southern New England.  I learned in that quarter century of duty what can happen to people and the environment (and Wall Street for that matter) when regulations are lifted or ignored.  It is never pretty, and it is always tragic.

 

A medallion awarded me in 2005 by the Chamber of Commerce of Eastern CT for my role in saving the Subase from BRAC closure (largely because of existing contamination) is just one testament to the importance of biological knowledge in solving our varied problems.  Naturally, I conclude that voters should put a high premium on candidate’s qualifications come November.  This is no time for slogans or “nice” people, who sound best in form while ducking the questions.  Neither will we be served by blind loyalties to political parties and meaningless partisan dogma.  We need people in Congress who are activists, not rubber stamps for earmarks, bad policies, misdirection and maintaining a dysfunctional status quo.

 

We’re in big trouble in America, and the systemic changes necessary to save our country require progressive politics.  History has shown us, furthermore, that such political reformations never come from inside the existing, corporately controlled two-party establishment.  Indeed, unfettered corporate power is the #1 threat to America these days.  Bear in mind that the new corporate ascendancy has created dozens of global companies larger than most national economies.  Corporations have become private governments to which our Democrat and Republican congressmen have become electoral sycophants and interchangeable parts.  The strategy of the two toxic parties is to select people who have no firm convictions beyond putting retention of power and their own political careers ahead of solving our problems, people who can be molded as career politicians and lack the education or experience to deal with crises of unprecedented debt, catastrophic pollution, crippling unemployment and worsening energy dilemmas. The two moneyed parties are the parties of failure and the expectation of failed memories.  They subvert democracy to support the corporate oligarchy.  Their approach is as old as imperialism, muttonchops beards and McKinley.  Candidates, who refuse to publicly acknowledge that fact, do not deserve our vote.  Such votes would be wasted, turned sour like wine stored in the summer sun.

 

The world is changing faster than our incremental, two-party Congress can adapt to it.  Science moves even faster, and policy makers, who lack scientific training and the knowledge which accompanies it, are a national liability, especially when they rely on questionable sources of information, skewed to corporate agendas, for remedial assistance.  Special interest distortions and misrepresentations of science are prevalent these days, and that should anger all but the perpetrators themselves.  But, be cautious.  It is never enough just to be angry.  Anger, without reason and sound judgment to channel it, only adds to the confusion, and confusion always helps the powerful.  Bombastic demagogues have fanned such anger into conflagrations to consume our best intentions and rational thought.  Failed artists and mad monks have attained political power that way with disastrous results.

 

I ask you, instead, to focus your rage into 20/20 foresight and a thorough evaluation of all the candidates’ qualifications.  Think of the issues: climate change, stem cell research, creating Green jobs and alternative/renewable energy, genetic modification of plants and animals and the threat of “monocrops” (a.k.a. green deserts) from transgenic contamination, food-borne bacterial illnesses and deaths, pandemics, human population growth and escalating demands on diminishing oil reserves, infrastructure repair, mass transit, affordable health care accessible to all, oceanic oil pollution, applying natural selection to Wall Street, depleted fish populations, the shell game and futures trading of cap-and-trade carbon offsets, sustainable local agriculture, zero-waste manufacturing.    We don’t need Democrat/Republican fat cats in Congress, groomed and pampered by special interest campaign donations (which they admittedly seek 3 of every 4 hours they spend in Washington).  We need alley cats, tough and determined, with degrees in the biological sciences, focused on problem solving.  One has a website (DeshefyforCongress.org).  I ask for your vote in November.

 

Scott Deshefy is Green Party candidate for U.S. House of Representatives in the 2nd CT Congressional District



Weigh Each Candidate's Qualifications

I’m neither a career politician nor a high-paid reader of Teleprompters, but a scientist and collegiate lecturer, who devoted 26 years of DEP service to the protection of Connecticut’s people and the ecology of southern New England.  The medallion awarded me by the Chamber of Commerce of Eastern CT in 2005 for helping save the Subase from BRAC closure (largely because of existing contamination) is just one of many testaments to the importance of that kind of knowledge in solving our varied problems.  Naturally, I believe voters should put high premiums on candidate’s qualifications come November.  This is no time for slogans or “nice” people, who sound best in form while ducking the questions.  Neither will we be served by blind loyalties to political parties and meaningless partisan dogma.  We need people in Congress who are activists, not rubber stamps for earmarks, bad policies, misdirection and a dysfunctional status quo.  We’re in big trouble in America, and systemic changes necessary to save our country require progressive politics.  History has shown, furthermore, that such political reformations never come from inside the existing, corporately controlled two-party establishment.

 

Unfettered corporate power is the #1 threat to America these days.  Bear in mind that the new corporate ascendancy has created dozens of global companies larger than most national economies.  Corporations have become private governments to which our democrat and republican congressmen have become electoral sycophants.  The two moneyed parties are the parties of failure and the expectation of failed memories.  Their approach is as old as imperialism, muttonchops beards and McKinley.  Candidates, who refuse to publicly acknowledge that fact, do not deserve our vote.  Such votes would be wasted.

 

The world is changing faster than our incremental, two-party Congress can adapt to it.  Science moves even faster, and policy makers, who lack scientific training and the knowledge which accompanies it, are a national liability, especially when they rely on questionable sources of information, often skewed by corporate agendas, for remedial assistance.  Special interest distortions and misrepresentations of science are prevalent these days.  That should anger all but the perpetrators.   But anger is never enough.  Anger, without reason and sound judgment to channel it, only adds to the confusion, and confusion always helps the powerful.  Consequently, bombastic demagogues can easily fan discontent into conflagrations which consume our rational thinking.  Failed artists and mad monks have attained political power that way with disastrous results.  I ask you, instead, to focus your rage into a 20/20 foresight, a thorough evaluation of all the candidates’ qualifications.  Think of the issues: climate change, stem cell research, creating Green jobs and alternative/renewable energy, GMOs and the threat of “monocrops” (a.k.a. green desserts) from transgenic contamination, food-borne bacterial illnesses and deaths, pandemics, affordable health care accessible to all, oceanic oil pollution, applying natural selection to Wall Street, sustainable local agriculture, zero-waste manufacturing.    We don’t need fat cats in Congress, groomed and pampered by special interest campaign donations.  We need alley cats, tough and determined, with degrees in the biological sciences.  One has a website (DeshefyforCongress.org).

 

Scott Deshefy is Green Party candidate for U.S. House of Representatives in the 2nd CT Congressional District

 

G. Scott Deshefy, 213 Hoxie Road, Lebanon, CT 06249  tele: 860-642-7066

Support the Best Qualified Candidates For Office

I’ve buttered my family’s bread neither as a career politician nor a high-paid reader of tele-prompters, but as a scientist and collegiate lecturer, who devoted 26 years of DEP service to the protection of the people and ecology of Connecticut and southern New England.  The medallion awarded me in 2005 by the Chamber of Commerce of Eastern CT for my role in saving the Subase from the BRAC commission (largely because of existing contamination) is just one of many testaments to the importance of that kind of knowledge in solving our varied problems.  Naturally, I conclude that voters should put a high premium on candidate’s qualifications come November.  This is no time for slogans or “nice” people, who sound best in form while ducking the questions.  Neither will we be served by blind loyalties to political parties and meaningless partisan dogma.  We need people in Congress who are activists, not rubber stamps for earmarks, bad policies, misdirection and a dysfunctional status quo.  We’re in big trouble in America, and the systemic changes necessary to save our country require progressive politics.  History has shown us, furthermore, that such political reformations will never come from inside the existing, corporately controlled two-party establishment.  Indeed, unfettered corporate power is the #1 threat to America these days.  Bear in mind that the new corporate ascendancy has created dozens of global companies larger than most national economies.  Corporations have become private governments to which our democrat and republican congressmen have become electoral sycophants.  The two moneyed parties are the parties of failure and the expectation of failed memories.  Their approach is as old as imperialism, muttonchops beards and McKinley.  Candidates, who refuse to publicly acknowledge that fact, do not deserve our vote.  Such votes would be wasted.


The world is changing faster than our incremental, two-party Congress can adapt to it.  Science moves even faster, and policy makers, who lack scientific training and the knowledge which accompanies it, are a national liability, especially when they rely on questionable sources of information, often skewed to corporate agendas, for remedial assistance.  Special interest distortions and misrepresentations of science are prevalent these days, and that should anger all but the perpetrators themselves.  Only it is never enough to be angry.  Anger, without reason and sound judgment to channel it, only adds to the confusion, and confusion always helps the powerful.  Consequently, bombastic demagogues can easily fan such anger into a conflagration which consumes our rational thought.  Failed artists and mad monks have attained political power that way with disastrous results.  I ask you, instead, to focus your rage into 20/20 foresight and a thorough evaluation of all the candidates’ qualifications.  Think of the issues: climate change, stem cell research, creating Green jobs and alternative/renewable energy, GMOs and the threat of “monocrops” (a.k.a. green deserts) from transgenic contamination, food-borne bacterial illnesses and deaths, pandemics, affordable health care accessible to all, oceanic oil pollution, applying natural selection to Wall Street, sustainable local agriculture, zero-waste manufacturing.    We don’t need fat cats in Congress, groomed and pampered by special interest campaign donations.  We need alley cats, tough and determined, with degrees in the biological sciences.

 

Scott Deshefy is Green Party candidate for U.S. House of Representatives in the 2nd CT Congressional District

 

G. Scott Deshefy, 213 Hoxie Road, Lebanon, CT 06249  tele: 860-642-7066

Deshefy Blasts Courtney's Pro War Vote

GREEN PARTY OF CONNECTICUT

 News Release- July 28, 2010- for immediate release   

Contact: Scott Deshefy, Candidate for Congress

Tim McKee, Spokes person and National Committee member, cell (860) 860-778-1304,

DESHEFY BLASTS COURTNEY’S PRO WAR VOTE

 

       Green Party candidate for the Second Congressional District Scott Deshefy blasted Democrat Joe Courtney for voting against a resolution pulling troops out of Pakistan. The Green Party of the U.S. had been urging Congress to pass House Resolution 301 to remove US forces from Pakistan. The  resolution was introduced by Reps. Dennis Kucinich (D-Oh.) and Ron Paul (R-Tex.), who said that President Obama's plans for an increase of US troops in Pakistan violate the 1973 War Powers Authorization. The resolution had both Democrat and Republican supporters.

    Scott Deshefy said he supports an end to the US war on Afghanistan, which the Obama Administration has escalated by deploying more troops and ordering air attacks across the border in Pakistan. The Green Party opposes the current war escalation supplemental bill and all proposals to increase war funding.

    Deshefy said "Mr. Obama is repeating the reckless and illegal policies of the Bush-Cheney Administration. His refusal to consult Congress about expanding the war, in violation of the War Powers Resolution, proves that he has learned from his predecessors that he can overstep his power with impunity. That's why the Kucinich-Paul resolution was so important -- it holds the White House to at least some standard of accountability!”

     Deshefy said that the election of a few Greens to Congress would establish an uncompromised antiwar bloc, which would demand quick withdrawal of all troops from Iraq and Afghanistan; oppose funding for the wars, and support reductions in military spending.

-30-

 http://www.deshefyforcongress.org

Vote to Oppose Corporate, Two-party Tyranny

When you vote next Fall, consider that November 2010 marks 100 years since a secret meeting of top financiers and politicians at Jekyll Island, Georgia.  What those bankers wanted was a bailout system to protect financial sectors against another crash like the Panic of 1907, a central bank ultimately brokered by Woodrow Wilson, which became the Federal Reserve in 1913, socializing their risk while they continued to privatize profits.  Those financiers knew the central bank would need political backing and financial support by the U.S. government, and since 1910 they simultaneously pay rolled democrat and republican campaigns to get it.  As we learned from the crash of 2008 and again will learn from the meltdown to come, caused by continued lack of meaningful regulation of Wall Street, those financiers expected little or no government oversight in return for their bucks.

 

Voters in November will again see my name on the ballot for U.S. House of Representatives alongside my democrat and republican adversaries.  A quick visit to my website (DeshefyforCongress.org) will delineate many philosophical differences between my approach to actually solving our nation’s problems and the convergent, corporately cloned, status quo thinking of my opponents, guaranteed to continue exacerbating our difficulties.  Not the least of our differences is that I, a Green Party candidate, will not accept corporate campaign donations, not now, not ever.  “Crats” and “Pubs” do…by the millions!  That is why the two toxic parties select people, who have no firm convictions beyond putting retention of political power and their own political careers ahead of the ecology, reducing military spending and immediately ending the wars, creating green jobs, developing alternative energy and reinstalling Glass-Steagall.  In a perverse parody of Will Rogers, they never met a corporation they didn’t want to bail out: military, financial, Big Oil or otherwise.  What else can explain the latest gift to General Dynamics of Pfizer’s old haunt in New London, where the chains of middle class families forced from their homes by eminent domain still rattle?

 

Scott Deshefy is Green Party Candidate for U.S. House of Representatives, 2nd CT Congressional District

 

G. Scott Deshefy

213 Hoxie Road

Lebanon, CT 06249 860-642-7066

Illusions of Choice

In times of crises we have moral obligations to distinguish sense from nonsense, to accept complex solutions warranting systemic change rather than oversimplifications embedded in jingoism.  History teaches that wherever freedom and democracy have evolved, [1 percent of the world population four centuries ago to more than a third today,] those values were inextricably bound to science and liberalism.  When we suspend reason, as do democrats and republicans in congress, the country takes a dark path to the edge of a precipice.  “Crats” and “Pubs” have been engineered by corporate campaign donations (which we Greens refuse) to be interchangeable parts in a machinery designed to perpetuate corporate wealth at the expense of the common good, to sustain an American corporate oligarchy with an allegiance only to profit.  Why else do we still lack meaningful regulation of Wall Street on the heels of one corporate military bailout after another, the latest a gift to General Dynamics of Pfizer’s prior haunt in New London, where chains still rattle from taxpaying, middle class families forced from their homes by eminent domain?

 

The two toxic parties select people, who have no firm convictions beyond putting retention of political power and their own political careers ahead of solving the nation’s problems, people who can be molded as career politicians and do not have the education or experience to deal with crises of their own making: unprecedented debt, catastrophic pollution, crippling unemployment, addiction to fossil fuels and a doctrine of continuous war.  To choose between “Crat” and “Pub” in the election booth is no choice at all.  That is why I will be on the ballot again in November, not a career politician or run-of-the-mill lawyer, but a scientist.  Please visit my website (DeshefyforCongress.org).

 

Scott Deshefy is the 2010 Green Party candidate for U.S. House of Representatives, 2nd CT Congressional District

 

G. Scott Deshefy

Lebanon, CT 06249

860-642-7066

2008 Green Party Candidate for Congress, Scott Deshefy, Again on Ballot in 2010

Guaranteed 2010 ballot access in November via my third place finish in 2008 and unanimous Green Party nomination last April, I announce to remind readers, perhaps not aware of my candidacy, exactly what separates my qualifications for the U.S. House of Representatives from my democratic and still undetermined republican challengers.  Furthermore, I invite readers to thoroughly examine my website (DeshefyforCongress.org) to compare my background and positions with my opponents. Only I represent the systemic changes we need to save America.

 

Current U.S. policies, sadly supported by both democrats and republicans in Congress, show that “Pubs” and “Crats” are interchangeable parts, owned and operated by corporate campaign donations (which Green Party candidates, such as I, refuse to accept) in order to sustain corporate profiteering and the corporate oligarchy which displaces democracy in the U.S. The strategy of these two toxic parties is to select people, who have no firm convictions beyond putting retention of power and their own political careers ahead of solving our nation’s problems, people who can be molded as career politicians and do not have the education or experience to deal with crises of unprecedented debt, catastrophic pollution, crippling unemployment and worsening energy dilemmas.

 

What separates me from "Pub" and "Crat" challengers is that I am a scientist not a career politician or a lawyer.  Understanding ecological consequences, I would never have allowed BP exemptions from safety devices, which their multi-million dollar campaign donations to "Crats" and "Pubs" bought them.  Rather than bailout military corporations, I will fight to immediately end wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and to reduce by 40% the gluttonous military budget which is bankrupting U.S. taxpayers and indenturing us to China.  Rather than bailout Wall Street, I will fight to reinstall Glass-Steagall, regulate derivatives and break-up big banks.  I will fight for single-payer health care in America (essentially Medicare for everyone) because it is the only proven way to make health care affordable and accessible to every citizen.  I will fight to create sustainable jobs via small business incentives and by developing alternative energy, green technologies, mass transit and by replacing our dilapidated American infrastructure, including water and sewage systems.  I will fight to end corporate welfare, congressional earmarks and subsidies for environmentally harmful practices.  I will fight against privatization of resources and for local rather than factory farming.   I ask for your vote in November.

 

G. Scott Deshefy is the 2010 Green Party candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives, 2nd CT Congressional District

 

G. Scott Deshefy

Lebanon, CT          860-642-7066      

Negligence of America's Political Parties

During my quarter century tenure at CT DEP, in addition to preparing the first Type A ecological damage assessment claims in Connecticut history for oil spills to Long Island Sound, I often inspected underground storage tank facilities.  When checking gasoline dispensers for compliance with safety components, the first device on the list was a “shear valve,” an inexpensive device which automatically closed connections to thousands of gallons of pressurized gasoline which otherwise would pump to the surface when a vehicle crashed into a dispenser.  Without such devices, demolished pumps would spew gasoline into the environment and create inevitable conditions for infernos and explosions.  Nationally, many gasoline distributors did not want to install such safety devices, but regulators, such as I, held our ground.  The country is safer for it.

 

As the oil “spill’ in the Gulf remains unabated at 4 million gallons, we must consider that BP is not the only responsible party in this environmental tragedy.  Democrats and Republicans in congress also have conspired against the marine and coastal ecosystems, not only for the Gulf, but for the Atlantic, as well.  Congealed oil continues to sink into the water column and follow the Gulf Stream north creating an unprecedented liability. The U.S. and Great Britain could well be taken into receivership for hemispheric reparations.  All this could have been avoided if democrats and republicans in congress put the ecology, or anything else for that matter, ahead of getting re-elected.  As required by Norway, Brazil and most other coastal nations, acoustic blow out valves are required to be installed in any and all off-shore drilling rigs within their waters.  Our congressional incumbents could have mandated that BP and other oil corporations install acoustic blow out valves on the thousands of offshore drilling wells that crowd our coastal waterways. Devices comparable in function to shear valves on gasoline dispensers.  BP and other oil corporations successfully petitioned against such requirements, arguing that the $400,000 devices were “too expensive.”  Not nearly as expensive I suggest, as their biennial congressional campaign donations to receive such favorable, and ultimately, devastating exemptions.  Perhaps, we cannot sue incumbent democrats and republicans to indemnify their ecological and economic damages or to redress their willful negligence, but we can surely vote them out on their environmentally deaf ears come November.  Judge Underhill’s recent landmark decision in New Haven on the unconstitutionality of Connecticut campaign finance clearly demonstrates there are neither major nor minor political parties.   But there are two parties whose elections and decisions are financed by the corporate and Wall Street dime.  They are America’s “toxic parties.”

 

                             G. Scott Deshefy

                             Lebanon, CT 06249

                             860-642-7066

 

Scott Deshefy is the 2010 Green Party candidate for U.S. House of Representatives in the 2nd CT Congressional District 

Open To Wind Power in Long Island Sound

Green Party candidate for Congress Scott Deshefy said today he will push for wind power off Long Island Sound, now that federal government ruled in favor of the Cape Cod wind power plans. He added “Green power” such as windmills in the Sound makes sense today and is a clear alternative to nightmares of Oil drilling and Nuclear power pushed by his opponents in the 2nd Congress District race in Connecticut.

Deshefy said “If we can find a good place that is clear of shipping lanes, and not damaging to the fishing concerns, then we should have a good public debate about our “green power “ needs and using wind as a replacement to fossil fuels, such as oil.”

Deshefy noted Republicans' energy plans are mostly simplistic slogans such as “Drill, baby Drill” and Democrat Congressman Joe Courtney is big proponent of Nuclear Power, which uses large amounts of water for cooling and damages Long Island Sound as this water is returned at a higher temperature.

He added “Unlike Courtney and Obama, advocates of nuclear power and its continued generation of nuclear waste that last for generations, The Green Party believes wind power will supply electricity in perpetuity without the inevitability of going dry or potentially causing ecological and economic catastrophe by leaking 5,000 barrels of oil a day, as we unfortunately see happening right now in our Gulf coast waters."

Deshefy noted both oil and nuclear power are heavily subsidized by the taxpayer’s dollars and he thinks wind power could pay for itself in a few years if developed correctly.

Deshefy will be on the fall ballot as the Green Party candidate for Congress in the 2nd District (Eastern half of Connecticut)

Wall Street's Next Shell Game

Wall Street is heading for another collapse.  The same misguided congressional incumbents, who continue funding ill-fated wars in Afghanistan, Iraq, Yemen and Pakistan, have failed to reinstate Glass-Steagall, break-up big banks, impede derivatives or abolish the destructive compensation schemes which lead to toxic risk taking.  Al-Qaida poses no existential threat to America, but Wall Street’s opaque and highly leveraged complexities and its system of beliefs and incentives putting short-term profits ahead of long-term solvency do.  Consequently, six big banks now control nearly 65% of America’s GDP, hold the nation’s economy hostage and perpetuate a dysfunctional status quo by making large campaign donations to democrats and republicans alike to keep them in office as interchangeable parts.  As a result, we long suffer a corporate oligarchy in America instead of democracy.  I may not be Andrew Jackson, Teddy Roosevelt or FDR incarnate, but just as they provided the leadership to take on and break-up big banks, I will wage that battle if elected to congress.


Big banks are dangerous to the economy, and deregulation, combined with government subsidies by democrats and republicans, has made politically connected banks big.  The biggest now look to build bubbles on something other than sub-prime mortgages.  I predict the next bubble in futures trading will involve cap-and-trade carbon offsets.  Unlike traditional commodities, which sometimes must be delivered to someone in physical form during the course of market exchange, the carbon market is based on lack of delivery of an invisible substance to no one.  What could better diffuse into the murky, untraceable dealings of Wall Street, even with the SEC on alert?


Carbon trading is already the fastest-growing commodities market on earth.  Over $300 billion worth of carbon transactions have occurred in less than five years, a figure likely to explode to a $3 trillion market if the U.S institutes cap-and-trade policy.  The projects in Europe alone already far outstrip the U.N.’s ability to police them, and study after study has found that approved Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects fail to reduce the amount of emissions promised.  Market forces created the worldwide industrial growth that has largely contributed to global warming, but the U.N. preposterously now concludes that those same forces can be used to mitigate climate change.


The same multinational scoundrels responsible for looting Wall Street either fund or own major carbon project developers, resurfacing again and again like Sherlock Holmes’ adversarial arch-villain, Professor Moriarty.  J. P. Morgan Chase owns the biggest developer in the world, Eco-Securities; Goldman Sachs has a big interest in the largest U.S.-based developer, Blue Source; Citibank hosts carbon trading desks in London.  Even the agricultural commodities firm, Cargill, has become one of the top developers of carbon projects, a distressing irony at best.  The largest sources of greenhouse gases, not to mention water pollution, are animal wastes from the “meat” industry, agricultural pollutants and felled trees.  Even Holmes would find it daunting to thwart such self-perpetuating profit through ecological destruction, another impervious layer to obscure Wall Street’s convoluted skullduggery.

                                   -G. Scott Deshefy, Lebanon, CT

Scott Deshefy is 2010 Green Party Candidate for U.S. House of Representatives, 2nd Dist.

Ralph Nader Speaks Out in Support of Single Payer Health Care

March 15, 2010. -The current state of the Health Care Bill before Congress - Progressives Speak Out!

 

Dr. Marcia Angell, former editor of the New England Journal of Medicine, calls not-for-profit, single payer national health care (think of it as "Medicare for all") "the only health care system that will both control costs and cover everyone." Recently she had this to say to Bill Moyers about the current bill before congress - [It] "cements the private insurance [companies] in place as the lynchpin of health care reform."

 

Former CIGNA executive Wendell Potter called the current bill "an absolute joke" and "an absolute gift to the insurance industry"

 

Ralph Nader made this statement - "Oblivious to the other Washington - afflicted by poverty, homelessness, AIDS, dilapidated buildings, and intolerable suffering. Oblivious to the scores who die every year in our nation's capital from lack of health care. The American people are suffering. Pressure is building. Official Washington cannot remain oblivious forever. There will be a decisive awakening. We will get full Medicare for all. Harvard Medical School researchers concluded last year that about 120 Americans die every day because they cannot afford health insurance. We need to drive that number down to zero."

 

Scott Deshefy -  "The democrats in congress have not just badly bungled America's chances for affordable and accessible health care, they have deliberately sold out the American people by conspiring to cede complete control of our medical care to insurance and pharmaceutical companies.  As I explain thoroughly in my position statements advocating for single-payer health care, insurance and pharmaceutical corporations have no desire to control the rising costs of health care.  They will always put profits ahead of your health and mine. As costs of health care increase and the system continues to unravel, they will simply drop coverages for the chronically ill and increase co-pays and deductibles for those still healthy enough to profitably cover. I have listed the many reasons why we must oppose the current health care bill before congress, and I am the only candidate running for the U.S. House of Representatives (in addition to Dennis Kucinich of Ohio), who will fight for single-payer national health care.  Morally and responsibly, it is the only rational course of action.  Those, who oppose single-payer, do so at our medical peril and to keep the campaign contributions flowing from insurance and pharmaceutical corporations.  If you advocate for single-payer health care as I do, or if you simply advocate for your own health care and the health of your loved ones, then I ask you to please consider a small donation to my campaign so I may combat the democrats, republicans and corporations, who put their political welfare ahead of the health of America.  Moreover, I ask for your vote in November.  A vote for Scott Deshefy is a vote for single-payer, not-for-profit, national health care.  Thank you."

 

Please visit my donation page to make an on-line contribution. Or to send a check. Thank you.

Failed Capitalism and Exploited Labor

As long as two largely interchangeable political parties dominate the domestic landscape, corporate elitists will continue to maintain and control a dysfunctional status quo, where the power of political contributions exceeds our power of ideas.  That is how the corporate state determines who gets heard and who does not, successfully blocking public debate about alternative forms of government in which third party candidates have equal access to voters and every candidate receives equal, publicly financed funding for campaigns.  Such an electoral process would replace the labels “major” and “minor” party with simply parties or, better yet, candidates, preventing corporate influence from stacking the deck. The economic crisis is one result of that systemic failure in capitalism stemming from a cultural exploitation of America’s work force sustained by corporate campaign donations to democrats and republicans alike.   Let us briefly examine how the American worker became enslaved by debt, and, consequently, America became a debtor nation.

 

From roughly 1820 to 1970, worker productivity and wages in the United States rose commensurately.  American workers, particularly after a systematic degradation of blue collar work in this country, began to discard traditional labor values of self-reliance, experience, commitment to craftsmanship and contribution to society. They turned instead to the dark side of capitalism, a cult of self, where success was defined as purchasing power, a soft despotism cited by Alexis de Tocqueville in the 19th century when U.S. workers still had limited needs, and their wants were neither artificially created nor manipulated by marketers.  Workers in these early stages of capitalism found the least noxious livelihood and worked, usually at home, in subsistence modes, often on a piece-rate basis.  Once wages increased with productivity, workers could suddenly be seduced into buying beyond their subsistence requirements and an illusion of “American exceptionalism” took hold of the country, a culture of consumption only now colliding with reality, the finitude of resources.

 

In the 1970s, productivity still increased but wages did not.  Computers began to replace workers.  European and Asian competitors to the U.S., whose industries had been demolished by war, had rebuilt them with state-of-the-art technologies designed to beat U.S. manufacturers by building cheaper and better products.  Women began working outside the home in greater numbers and another historical influx of immigrants swelled the work force.  Corporate America, looking for short-term profits, began shipping jobs overseas, a “can’t beat ‘em…join ‘em” philosophy for international competition.  Both American business and the American worker had a changing labor environment upon which to adapt.

 

Business adjusted to these changing times by keeping wage increases much lower than increases in worker productivity, thereby maximizing profits.  A wild euphoria followed as CEOs cashed in on these higher returns, paying themselves hundreds of times the average worker salary, complete with gargantuan bonuses.  Profits were less often reinvested for capital improvements and more often orchestrated into a orgy of mergers and competitor buy-outs.  Moreover, larger companies began to lend profit margins to underpaid employees and customers alike.  GM, as an example, became GMAC, more a bank and less a leading edge automobile manufacturer, maximizing profits by lending money to people who couldn’t afford their cars.  Other corporations followed suit, rather than pay higher wages to their workers, big business chose to lend money to employees instead.  Why increase wages to meet rising prices and productivity when corporations could lend money to their workers and have it paid back with interest?

 

Of course this was nothing new to industry.  In 1900, America had over 7,000 wagon and carriage manufacturers employing workers, who knew and crafted every component of the vehicles.  With the advent of Henry Ford’s assembly line, vehicle manufacturers gradually dwindled to the Big 3.   When craftsmen, who formerly had worked for the defunct vehicle manufacturers, were recruited to fill assembly line jobs, turnover rates were initially 9 to 1.  The culture of American labor was still very much a culture of individual craftsmanship and the fulfillment which comes with participating in every aspect of manufacturing a given product.  Furthermore, many American workers were still subsistence goal-oriented.  Once compensation for work met their costs for basic needs, productivity declined substantially.  Higher wages as an inducement for higher productivity only meant that subsistence requirements were met sooner in the work week and productivity waned, accordingly.  To overcome such urges in mass production work settings (now the electronic assembly line of cubicles, where computers have transformed offices of the future into factories of the past rewarding dispositions to conformity and bureaucracy), workers were encouraged to assume debt, to buy on credit.  Extraneous wants were created which could only be attained by disciplined long-term saving or the immediate gratification, albeit longtime shackle, of debt.  The combined psycho-manipulation of advertising, fads and immediate, credit-laden gratification gave rise to our indentured American working class, an American serfdom, an American proletariat.  These class distinctions are kept nebulous in times of overt nationalism and continuous states of anxiety over national security, yet another reason America is kept in a constant state of war.

 

In 1970, for the American worker, who had long defined success in life as purchasing power, wages suddenly failed to keep pace with even middle class simulations of opulence.  American workers were forced to work more hours, often both heads of households contributing time and energy to keep up with bills, while Europeans were working 20% less.  Consequently, and not surprisingly, the United States invented “fast food” and an unprecedented borrowing binge began.  The credit card was invented and homes were used as collateral to sustain debt.  Eventually, little or no collateral was needed for high interest “unsecured credit.”  These adjustments, both corporate and individual, have left the American working class exhausted.  Personal lives and families are in disarray, and anxiety is sky high as debts begin to exceed many incomes, joint and several.  The limits of capitalism have been reached.

 

All that remained was massive deregulation of Wall Street in the last 30 years concurrent with housing bubbles, inflated by rock bottom mortgage rates and absence of income qualifications, to bring this nation to the edge of an economic precipice.  Just as the U.S. worker, markets and banks have became exhausted by irresponsible leveraging and the exaltation of selfishness and institutionalized carelessness to the detriment of moral-cognitive virtues.  Likewise, our government, fatigued by corporate welfare, unprecedented national debts, subsidies, military contracts and other bailouts predicated on campaign donations to democrats and republicans, is taking a knee.  Ben Franklin said it best, “be frugal and free.”  We are no longer a free nation.

 

 

                                      G. Scott Deshefy

                                      Lebanon, CT

                                      860-642-7066

                                      gscottdeshefy@deshefyforcongress.org

G Scott Deshefy is a candidate for Congress for 2010, running in Connecticut's 2nd District.

3rd Party Will Stop U.S. Imperialism and Bailouts of Military Industries

Origins of America’s imperial presidency and its ministerial supporters in congress go back sixty-one years, shortly after Soviets developed the Bomb and Chinese communists put Mao Zedong in power.  The United States was at the zenith of its military strength and influence then, but U.S. national security administrators, playing on citizens’ fears, could easily convince the American public that we were in deep peril, and the danger was apocalyptic.  That fanned pervasive embers of anxiety, manufacturing consent for massive and unprecedented peacetime military spending, for training and equipping allied forces and for heightening covert operations at home and abroad.  Moreover, it nurtured an imperial presidency and congress whose primary function was to get reelected by supporting military hegemony.  American ideals camouflaged hybrids of U.S. political and corporate ambitions and obligatory expansionism designed to keep American profligacy intact and uncompromised.  As long as voters didn’t have to change their habits, good or bad, democrats and republicans got elected.  If rates of consumption of oil and other resources remained immutable, nonnegotiable and unmentionable during political debates, two-party tyrannies prevailed.  If war was necessary to grab resources from the rest of the world, then war had to be endless.

 

As a consequence, we suffer incumbents, who, under the guise of promoting peace, promote wars against exaggerated foes, wars which are open-ended and global and can neither be sustained by our armed forces nor by our economy.  Combating insurgents and nation-building have become euphemisms for successions of wars with a sustained U.S. presence, increasingly frequent and protracted by tactics which defy conventional military strategy and frustrate decisive engagement.  The fault for this continuum of violence lies not in the stars but in ourselves and the two-party continuum we have elected to congress.  We can no longer seek freedom from our responsibilities by blindly ceding responsibility to democrats and republicans each electoral cycle, thinking every election wipes the slate clean and the politically abusive behavior will stop just because their high-priced campaign ads suggest so.  It hasn’t before, and it won’t after November 2010.  The battered electorate must seek a divorce.

 

By failing to opt for third party answers to the problems that befall us, we have ceased to be a free nation.  By shirking our responsibilities in the election booth, we have equated freedom to consumerism, a condition of dependence and enslavement to imported goods, imported oil and other fossil fuels, and endless, shackle-forging credit.  Given and despite its repeated failures, stupefying incompetence and a nation on the brink, the two-party establishment banks on that dependency to get elected.  The White House and the congress, the military and the corporate elite rely on that dependency for power and prerogatives.  Moreover, they feast on American “denialism.”  There will be no energy independence in America without a strong third party presence in congress because clean, alternative U.S.-based energy would mean our bases in the Middle East would close, the 5th fleet would come home, and weapons contracts would be canceled.  In other words, those huge campaign donations to democrats and republicans from corporations and military industries, which profit most from war, would dry up.  But that drought will presage a green, progressive future for America.  All it takes is a generous sprinkling of third party votes in November.

 

 

                                    G. Scott Deshefy

                                    Lebanon, CT 06249

                                    860-642-7066

                                    gscottdeshefy@deshefyforcongress.org

 

Scott Deshefy is the 2010 Green Party candidate for U.S. House of Representatives,

2nd Connecticut Congressional District

 

Recent Supreme Court gives Corporations a Monopoly over our Political Process

Forget the usual subterfuge indenturing democrats and republicans to corporations.  The Supreme Court's recent judgment, ( i.e.: Citizens United vs. FEC) allowing unlimited corporate funding of campaign ads means the wealthy and corporate elite can now buy democrats and republicans in a public auction, sanctioned by the marketplace, the media (comprised of a few corporations which reap big profits from campaign ads) and the U.S. judicial system.  That monopoly power over elections, exacerbated by the Court's decision, all but guarantees we will never see true democracy in America and the poor and middle classes will continue to be oppressed by the plutocracy/corporate oligarchy we now suffer.

 

Corporations are not an oppressed minority, and thusly, the Court's equating free speech with their preferential monetary access to the media is reprehensible, perpetuating a dysfunctional political process which determines the outcome of elections on the basis of paid advertising rather than candidates' qualifications, ideals, and visions for America. This systemic failure promotes a two-party (really "uniparty") dominance of America's political landscape on which repeated elections of interchangeable parts guarantee a long deteriorating status quo responsible for America's decline.  Unless the electorate rejects those candidates, who fill their mailboxes with staged photos and illusory or exaggerated accomplishments or on behalf of whom corporations flood the TV and radio waves with multi-million dollar ads, we will not do what we must to save America, vote out democrats and republicans alike in 2010 and elect candidates, who represent the people.  Otherwise, democrats and republicans will continue to play the same sour notes orchestrated by institutions of wealth.

 

The Court has given neither a microphone to an unheard minority nor a microphone to America's majority incarnate.  It has given all the amplifiers inherent in the Constitution to what is already the loudest voice, the same shrill holler which resulted in bailouts for Wall Street, failing automobile manufacturers, medical insurance companies, financial institutions and military industries.  All hold the country hostage.  All demand ransoms of mounting tax dollars, deepening national debt, and congressional proposals designed to cede them power and continued control of America through congressional subsidies, military contracts and permission to destroy the ecology.  All rent the political stations currently leased by democrats and republicans in order to keep our wars open-ended and global, our profligacy uncompromised, our energy independence sacrificed to 739 foreign bases, the 5th Fleet and weapons contracts.  By equating consumerism to freedom (in particular, freedom from responsibility), the corporations keep our citizenry addicted to imported goods, imported oil and endless, albeit debilitating, credit.  Democrats and republicans get elected each cycle by promoting that dependency, trafficking enslavement to corporate profits.

 

Let us examine the constitutionality of the decision to treat corporations as individuals, a history stemming from an 1886 court case, Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad Company.  That Supreme Court decision in favor of the railroad ostensibly led to corporate personhood and free speech rights, guaranteeing protections under the 1st and 4th amendments.  Or did it?  Did a relatively mundane court case grant the same rights as individuals to corporations?  Chief Justice Morrison Waite wrote, "We avoided meeting the Constitutional question in the decision."  But, when the court case summary was written, holding itself no legal status, the Court reporter wrote: "The defendant Corporations are persons within the intent of the clause in section 1 of the 14th amendment to the Constitution of the United State, which forbids a state to deny any person within its jurisdiction to equal protection of the laws."   Apparently, the Court had made no such legal determination, and it is the Court clerk's misrepresentation and opinion of the case upon which current claims of corporate personhood and free speech entitlements reside.  That Court reporter, by the way, was a former railroad president, named J.C. Bancroft Davis.  Is it not a legal paradox, or at least a legal inconsistency, that inanimate, constructed entities should be awarded rights as individuals in America not yet fully granted the living (e.g., sentient non human animals with well-developed cognitive abilities)?   It is time to revisit Santa Clara County v. Southern Pacific Railroad. The Green Party will fight to overturn that 1886 ruling.  No other political party, no other candidates, no other elected congressman will.

 

When corporations are treated as citizens, it diminishes the power of real people and life in general.  Now is the time to coalesce into a populist movement and, in November, vote out the two parties subservient to and elected by corporate money.  Casting votes should be about the power of ideas not the power of bankrolls no matter how the media and occasional co-sponsors of political debates try to marginalize democracy and the power of ideas on the basis of campaign funding from special interests.  The Supreme Court's recent decision means economic inequality translates into political inequality.

 

Must it be so?  Imagine if GM put as much capital into developing fuel efficient/alternative energy cars as it does into democratic and republican war chests?  The money spent enabling their candidates to win, the bailouts to flow and the quality of vehicles to stagnate relative to fuel efficiency and pollution, could provide us a cleaner environment, energy independence and mass transit.  Imagine if the financial industry had retained in 2008 the $400 billion spent annually on republican and democrat campaigns?  Would our economy now be on the ropes?  Would we now have affordable and accessible health care for everyone if the pharmaceutical and medical insurance companies were not kept between us and our physicians by the untold billions of dollars in democratic and republican campaign donations which keep their administrative costs at a whopping 25%?  Would we be bailing out the military establishment with repeated and unnecessary contracts, paid with our taxes, if such earmarks were not guaranteed by their donations to incumbents?

For decades we have been politically abused and betrayed in America by an archaic and tyrannical two-party system.  But, despite our growing anger, like an abused spouse, we accept the repeatedly broken promises of corrective behavior, the insincere acts of contrition just before the elections and the surreal political propaganda of high-priced campaign ads funded by special interests.  We all know that democrats and republicans swarm to campaign donations from corporations, the obscenely wealthy and special interests like flies to sweet cream.  This nation we love is in serious decline because of such political practices, an abusive status quo stacking the deck against our better intentions, better qualified candidates and the very concept of democracy itself.  Thanks to the Supreme Court's recent decision, November 2010 may be our last chance to replace democrats and republicans with progressive, third party candidates and  resuscitate this nation.

                                      G. Scott Deshefy

                                      Lebanon, CT

                                      gscottdeshefy@deshefyforcongress.org

 

Scott Deshefy is the 2010 Green Party candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives, 2nd Connecticut Congressional District

 

 

Time to Rein in Out-of-Control Corporate Influences on Our Democracy

Quote from Statement made by Ralph Nader on the January 21, 2010 5-4 Supreme Court decision in the Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission case.

Yesterday's 5-4 decision by the U.S. Supreme Court in Citizens United v. Federal Election Commission shreds the fabric of our already weakened democracy by allowing corporations to more completely dominate our corrupted electoral process. It is outrageous that corporations already attempt to influence or bribe our political candidates through their political action committees (PACs), which solicit employees and shareholders for donations.

With this decision, corporations can now directly pour vast amounts of corporate money, through independent expenditures, into the electoral swamp already flooded with corporate campaign PAC contribution dollars. Without approval from their shareholders, corporations can reward or intimidate people running for office at the local, state, and national levels.

Much of this 183 page opinion requires readers to enter into a fantasy world and accept the twisted logic of Justice Kennedy, who delivered the opinion of the Court, joined by Chief Justice Roberts, and Justices Scalia, Alito, and Thomas. Imagine the majority saying the “Government may not suppress political speech based on the speaker’s corporate identity.”

Perhaps Justice Kennedy didn’t hear that the financial sector invested more than $5 billion in political influence purchasing in Washington over the past decade, with as many as 3,000 lobbyists winning deregulation and other policy decisions that led directly to the current financial collapse, according to a 231-page report titled: “Sold Out: How Wall Street and Washington Betrayed America” (See: WallStreetWatch.org).

The Center for Responsive Politics reported that last year the U.S. Chamber of Commerce spent $144 million to influence Congress and state legislatures.

The Center also reported big lobbying expenditures by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) which spent $26 million in 2009. Drug companies like Pfizer, Amgen and Eli Lilly also poured tens of millions of dollars into federal lobbying in 2009. The health insurance industry trade group America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP) also spent several million lobbying Congress. No wonder Single Payer Health insurance – supported by the majority of people, doctors, and nurses – isn’t moving in Congress.

Energy companies like ExxonMobil and Chevron are also big spenders. No wonder we have a national energy policy that is pro-fossil fuel and that does little to advance renewable energy (See: OpenSecrets.org).

No wonder we have the best Congress money can buy.  Read the full article......

Green Senatorial Campaign Committee Recognized

Federal Election Commission Advisory Opinion 2006-36 represents the first time a political party other than the Democrats or Republicans has been granted a national party campaign committee. Such committees have higher limits on campaign contributions that they can accept and give to candidates.  Read more....

Howard Zinn, A Man for the People

It is with great sorrow that I mention here the passing of Howard Zinn, a great teacher, a prolific writer, and a patriot in the true sense. Dismissed by most in the main stream media as an extreme left wing activist; the passing of this most noble of men, is barely mentioned.  But the blogosphere is full of tributes to this great man. His many tomes on the history of this country give a voice to the disenfranchised. The Native Americans, Blacks, women, immigrants, poor laborers, and others whose lives and spirit counted for little in mainstream histories. Howard Zinn’s passing is a great loss. Especially at a time when intellectual courage and conviction are in short supply, his commitment to expose the lies and confront the injustices of our currrent political system stands as a powerful example that we should all follow. He will be missed.